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I need more industrial and punk music.  Really digging Swans' 1983 album Filth as well as Killing Joke's 1980 self-titled album.

Speaking of which, there's a band called Algiers (they're signed to Matador) and they recently released their debut self-titled, and it has some rather interesting influences of punk, blues, gospel and industrial music.  It's very unique but the industrial influences are great.

I need more industrial music. :iconmoarplz:  Industrial punk is most preferable but I'm open to other kinds of industrial music too.
Here's an idea for a thread:

Post your favorite music recordings from this year.

Here's what I've enjoyed, so far:

Disappears - Irreal

Krautrock influenced post-punk from Chicago.

Punch Brothers - Phosphorescent Blues

Chris Thile's bluegrass follow-up from Nickel Creek's 2014 album, A Dotted Line.  Not strictly bluegrass, however.

Illoquence & Rythmatical - D​.​E​.​A​.​T​.​H

Great instrumental hip-hop album.  Production is simple and has plenty of room for further development.

Moon Duo - Shadow of the Sun

A nice psychedelic and new-wave influenced album from San Francisco

Airøspace - All Dreams End

Good mixtape from a Washington, D.C. based rapper.  Makes fun and nerdy anime references in his music.

So what have you enjoyed this year so far?

Disappears - Irreal

image


A few years ago I had the chance to see Chicago-based Disappears perform in Bloomington, Ind. at The Bishop.  Steve Shelley was playing drums and he showed such enthusiasm and motivation when playing.  He’s a terrific drummer, integral of Sonic Youth and Disappears’ set that night was fantastic.

Shelley’s time with Disappears was short lived, but the band today continues to experiment and explore new music territory while tipping their hats to notably-influential 70s krautrock and 90s alternative rock bands.  Irreal will be released Jan. 19 on Kranky Records.  These are just a few songs worth listening to:

Loud and expansive percussion rhythms soak up dissonant guitar rhythms and subtle bass melodies in “Interpretation”.  The guitar rhythms are very reminiscent of late 80s and early 90s Sonic Youth as well as early Blonde Redhead.  A nice harmonic melody briefly interrupts the guitar rhythms before they resume.  The lyrics “Anything could happen” can be heard as a louder and noisier guitar plays a slow melody.  The louder guitar melody ends the song almost sounding like the post-metal band Pelican.  Perhaps it’s just a coincidence, but it’s a very fun coincidence nonetheless.

"I_O" again takes influences from early Blonde Redhead, but the vocals sounded quite a bit like that of Jeff Mueller (Rodan, June of 44, Shipping News).  Perhaps it seems like an unusual direction for Disappears to take influence from 90s post-rock and math rock bands, but tipping the hat to such obscure bands will leave a good impression on others.

"Another Thought" features a dark and repetitive rhythm.  The rhythms are repetitive and simplistic in the sense that it allows the music to be layered with other elements to grow in complexity.  It seems quite reminiscent of the Cologne-based krautrock band, Can.  They too, in albums such as 1971’s Tago Mago and 1972’s Ege Bamyasi, would take simplistic rhythms and build upon them to develop complex songs.

Overall, the album is quite minimalistic which seems to pay homage to the band’s krautrock influences.  Irreal rightfully confirms that Disappears are a krautrock-influenced alternative rock band.  The songs are layered and complex with rich and noisy texture.

Perhaps such influences weren’t as obvious in previous Disappears releases, but this is an exciting direction for the band as well as Kranky Records.  This is a very fun album.

image

Those who enjoyed Nickel Creek’s 2014 release A Dotted Line will not be disappointed with Chris Thile’s upcoming album with the Punch Brothers, The Phosphorescent Blues, set for release on Nonesuch Records on Jan. 27.

A few songs that stand out:

"Familiarity" starts with a strong and energetic mandolin melody, but the delayed string instruments that fade out allow Thile to emerge with a sincere and awe-inspiring vocal delivery.  Meanwhile, a marching-like rhythm develops and culminates at 2:48 with a rather enjoyable melody that seems to gradually edge itself down and up the scale.  The rest of the Punch Brothers chime in to create a harmonious vocal delivery as Thile softly sings, "I love you".  The fluttering fiddle is very bright and uplifting.  "Familiarity" is a long song, running almost ten and a half minutes, but it contains so many widely-ranging emotions.  Of all of Chris Thile’s work with Nickel Creek, Punch Brothers as well as his solo work, "Familiarity" ranks as one of his best album-openers.  It’s articulate and dynamic and helps to humanize contemporary folk and bluegrass music.

"Passepied", as composed by Claude Debussy, features grand ascending and descending mandolin melodies accompanied with enamored strings.  It’s wonderful to hear Thile continue to recognize his classical roots, and it’s quite exciting how he and the Punch Brothers can make classical music relevant for 2015.  A live performance of this song can be viewed on Youtube.

"Boll Weevil" seems to return to some of Thile’s roots with Nickel Creek, such as "Smoothie Song" from This Side and “When in Rome” from Why Should the Fire Die?  Bright and vibrant melodies are accompanied by strings playing some delightful double stops.

The entire album is gold, and it’s hard to be disappointed by Thile.  Even though influences of bluegrass, folk and classical music are apparent in The Phosphorescent Blues, the album remains truly unique, making it difficult to categorize the album into a single category.  An early 2015 favorite, by far.

carlsimmons.tumblr.com/post/10…

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mphtmnslt
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Disappears - Irreal

image


A few years ago I had the chance to see Chicago-based Disappears perform in Bloomington, Ind. at The Bishop.  Steve Shelley was playing drums and he showed such enthusiasm and motivation when playing.  He’s a terrific drummer, integral of Sonic Youth and Disappears’ set that night was fantastic.

Shelley’s time with Disappears was short lived, but the band today continues to experiment and explore new music territory while tipping their hats to notably-influential 70s krautrock and 90s alternative rock bands.  Irreal will be released Jan. 19 on Kranky Records.  These are just a few songs worth listening to:

Loud and expansive percussion rhythms soak up dissonant guitar rhythms and subtle bass melodies in “Interpretation”.  The guitar rhythms are very reminiscent of late 80s and early 90s Sonic Youth as well as early Blonde Redhead.  A nice harmonic melody briefly interrupts the guitar rhythms before they resume.  The lyrics “Anything could happen” can be heard as a louder and noisier guitar plays a slow melody.  The louder guitar melody ends the song almost sounding like the post-metal band Pelican.  Perhaps it’s just a coincidence, but it’s a very fun coincidence nonetheless.

"I_O" again takes influences from early Blonde Redhead, but the vocals sounded quite a bit like that of Jeff Mueller (Rodan, June of 44, Shipping News).  Perhaps it seems like an unusual direction for Disappears to take influence from 90s post-rock and math rock bands, but tipping the hat to such obscure bands will leave a good impression on others.

"Another Thought" features a dark and repetitive rhythm.  The rhythms are repetitive and simplistic in the sense that it allows the music to be layered with other elements to grow in complexity.  It seems quite reminiscent of the Cologne-based krautrock band, Can.  They too, in albums such as 1971’s Tago Mago and 1972’s Ege Bamyasi, would take simplistic rhythms and build upon them to develop complex songs.

Overall, the album is quite minimalistic which seems to pay homage to the band’s krautrock influences.  Irreal rightfully confirms that Disappears are a krautrock-influenced alternative rock band.  The songs are layered and complex with rich and noisy texture.

Perhaps such influences weren’t as obvious in previous Disappears releases, but this is an exciting direction for the band as well as Kranky Records.  This is a very fun album.

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Tarsmus Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
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